Sheriff

The office of sheriff has a history that spans more than 1,300 years, starting in England sometime before the year 700 A.D. Since our system of government is based in large part on English law, the concept of the sheriff was brought to this country by the early colonists. In Minnesota, each of the 87 counties has a sheriff who is elected to office by citizens of their individual counties to a four year term. The sheriff is the chief law enforcement officer within the county.

The Wright County Sheriff’s Office is the 3rd largest sheriff’s office in Minnesota. We provide law enforcement services to the unincorporated areas of the county and additionally contract police services with 13 cities. There are eleven divisions within the sheriff’s office: Administration, Bailiff, Civil Process, Communications, Community Services, Corrections, Criminal Investigations, Patrol, Recreational Enforcement, Special Investigation’s Unit (Narcotics), and Warrants / Transports.



Commitment To Service


Wright County’s location just west of the Twin City metropolitan area has contributed to its rapid growth in recent years. The Sheriff’s Office has continued to meet the challenge by providing quality, efficient, cost effective law enforcement services to the citizens of the county.

Our organization holds itself accountable to the guiding principles of integrity, professionalism, caring and fairness. 



Sheriff's Office FAQ's

Wright County Citizen Alert System

We have launched a new Citizen Alert service that allows us to alert you. You opt-in to enter your contact information and subscribe to notifications you care about based on your location. The information you provide is protected and will not be used for any other purpose

How it works

When we issue a notification about a potential safety hazard or concern, you will receive a message on the voice or text communication methods that you have registered. If requested for the notification, you can confirm that you have received the message and you will not be contacted by any subsequent methods regarding that particular notification. If you do not confirm, the system will continue to attempt to reach you at all of the contact methods that you have provided.

Sign up for Notifications

Create an account and add your contact and location information into the Citizen’s Alert system. All information you provide will be kept strictly confidential.

Stop Receiving Notifications

You can stop receiving at any time by removing your contact information from your profile

To sign up for this service please follow this link


Drug Take Back Image of Pills

On Saturday, April 27, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. the Wright County Sheriff’s Office and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration will offer the community another opportunity to help prevent pill abuse and prescription drug theft by ridding their homes of potentially dangerous expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs. For those looking to participate in the program you may bring your unused medications to either of our two Take Back locations:

Monticello Community Center (505 Walnut St) or Clearwater City Hall (605 County RD. 75).

Please remember that we can only accept pills or patches and we cannot accept liquids, needles or sharps. The service is free and anonymous, no questions asked.

Last fall Americans turned in nearly 460 tons (more than 900,000 pounds) of prescription and over-the-counter medications at more than 5,800 sites operated by the DEA and almost 4,800 of its state and local law enforcement partners. Overall, in its 16 previous Take Back events, DEA and its partners have taken in almost 11 million pounds—nearly 5,500 tons—of unused medications.

Almost 100 pounds of prescription drugs were collected and destroyed through the Wright County Sheriff’s Office partnership with the DEA National Prescription Drug Takeback program.

This initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. Medicines that languish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse, and abuse. Rates of prescription drug abuse in the U.S. are alarmingly high, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s National Survey on Drug Use and Health shows year after year that the majority of misused and abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including someone else’s medication being stolen from the home medicine cabinet. In addition, Americans are now advised that their usual methods for disposing of unused medicines—flushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash—both pose potential safety and health hazards.

We will not accept any liquid medications. Unused liquid medications should be returned to the clinic that issued them. Needles (Sharps) can be disposed of for free at the Wright County Compost & Recycling Facility. Never place containers with used needles or syringes in a recycling bin or loose sharps in the garbage.

Mercury-containing devices cannot be safely incinerated, so do not bring mercury thermometers or other devices to medication collection boxes. Mercury is a potent neurotoxin. Take mercury-containing products to Wright County Compost & Recycling Facility - please call 763-682-7338 to schedule an appointment.

For more information about the disposal of prescription drugs or about the April 27 Take Back Day event, go to www.DEATakeBack.com or contact the Wright County Sheriff’s Office at 763-682-7637.